Anonymous asked: OHmygosh what did you take those panoramas with?

So both of those I took with a Canon T1i and a 17-200mm Tamron lens

I panned horizontally across the horizon, trying hard to keep it on the center focal point of my viewfinder, and I took about 10 images for each one.

Here’s some quick tips for those of you wanting to do panoramas:

  • Photoshop CS2 is free, and has the automate function necessary to make high quality panoramas
  • shoot in manual so your exposure is locked and you don’t have to edit each frame individually in post
  • edit in lightroom then export to photoshop to build the panorama so you can edit the color data in RAW, and not a jpg later on

thanks, so glad you liked them!

The mountains looked so perfect and peaceful this afternoon.

The mountains looked so perfect and peaceful this afternoon.

I found some fresh air today.

I found some fresh air today.

More Landscapes and Nature Shots From My Walks

See More:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

More Landscapes and Nature Shots From My Walks

See More:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

lonelylonelylonelyeyes is proud to be an american or whatever

lonelylonelylonelyeyes is proud to be an american or whatever

More Landscapes and Nature Shots From My Walks

See More:

Part One

Part Two

We are all just storms with skin stretched over our problems. 
It rained here today, and I felt like a storm trapped in a storm and I’ve never been surrounded by more people and felt so alone. The sky shattered today, and from it fell tears of shattered glass and they bounced around and glistened prettily in the golden sunset light, but it got dark again just like it always does, and it got cold again just like it always does and I need you to both light my way and keep me warm but you’re a ghost. I got out your old journal today just to hold onto it while the storm threatened the integrity of my foundations. It rained. Oh my god did it rain. Not for any single thing in particular, but for the sake of the storm inside me, for the sake of release, for the sake of a careful moment trapped in my mind. It doesn’t rain often anymore, but when it does, it sure does flood.

We are all just storms with skin stretched over our problems.

It rained here today, and I felt like a storm trapped in a storm and I’ve never been surrounded by more people and felt so alone. The sky shattered today, and from it fell tears of shattered glass and they bounced around and glistened prettily in the golden sunset light, but it got dark again just like it always does, and it got cold again just like it always does and I need you to both light my way and keep me warm but you’re a ghost. I got out your old journal today just to hold onto it while the storm threatened the integrity of my foundations. It rained. Oh my god did it rain. Not for any single thing in particular, but for the sake of the storm inside me, for the sake of release, for the sake of a careful moment trapped in my mind. It doesn’t rain often anymore, but when it does, it sure does flood.

10 Tips for Photographers (or Other Creative Type Peoples)

  1. Be careful about what you consume. I know lots of authors have said this before, but I specifically remember fishingboatproceeds saying once that authors are only as good at writing as the books they read, and I think that’s so unbelievably true with any creative passion. You’ve got to consume good, quality art to make good, quality art. I love Tumblr for that exact reason. It’s so easy to find all these great photographers and their work is delivered straight to me. I’m never in need for more good work to get inspired by.
  2. Understand that inspiration can come from other forms of creative passions too. Just because I’m a photographer doesn’t mean I only look at photographs for inspiration. I really like how erickimphoto always talks about buying “books not gear.” He is mostly talking about photo books, of course, but I think some of the books that have been most influential on my photography have been regular, word books. In addition to books, a lot of my inspiration comes from films as well as music. I think it’s important to surround as many senses as you can with cool stuff that people have created. Sometimes it’s something completely unexpected that’ll inspire you.
  3. Create with other people who also like to create. This one is so important. I see all the time, fellow photographers feeling like creating is a lonely process, and I can attest to that, but as for me, I’ve been really lucky that I have been able to get all my closest friends into photography as well, and even made some new ones along the way because of it. I think if you’ll just start inviting your friends to create alongside you, or to be around to keep you company while you create, you’ll be amazed at how much it can heighten the process. Sidenote: most of my friends own Olympus E-PL1’s, which was my first digital camera, and it’s kind of the cutest thing ever.
  4. Talk to and/or collaborate with people you look up to. Find someone who you really like their work and try to get in touch with them. I bet you’ll find out that they are a regular person who also likes to talk shop with other fellow creatives, and even maybe like to work on a project with you or get/give some critique. This can be incredibly beneficial to everyone involved and it’s a great way to feel better about your own work.
  5. That being said, put faith in your own work, and don’t rely on other people’s likes and positive feedback alone. You created something cool, and you should feel awesome about it. Try not to forget that, even when you’re feeling unsure.
  6. Don’t let your tools define you. You Are Not a Gadget is a great book by Jaron Lanier taught me that I’m not my tools, that what I use to create doesn’t run my life, nor does it define my aesthetic. Don’t rely on your tools to create, rely on yourself. Also, go read that book, it’s incredible. 
  7. Spend your time wisely. I know you’ve heard this one so many times before, but times is important, and it’s important that you set schedules to be on and off the computer or tablet. I usually spend about an hour a day looking at photographs and checking on Tumblr, and I’m trying to break that down to an hour every two days, so I can spend a little more time creating. Find what works for you and stick with it.
  8. Don’t post your work right away. I see it happen all the time, someone will be busy uploading to a social network site and miss something fun to shoot. Or worse yet, you’ll upload something you haven’t had time to fully digest or edit properly and later you’ll be unhappy with it, and it’ll be too late because everyone has already seen it. I like to wait at the very least, a day or two before I post anything. I never share photos while I’m still out taking photos because I could miss something, and it takes me too far out of the moment. 
  9. Find your own niche and look, but don’t be afraid to step out of that comfort zone. I know what I’m good at as far as photography goes, and I know where my skills are lacking. In addition to that, I also know what works well and gets lots of notes on Tumblr because I know what my followers like to see, but that doesn’t mean that I make those specific things all the time. Make what you want, whenever you want. Don’t be afraid to try something new just because it’s not normal for you to do so. It’s how you grow as a creative.
  10. Make first; ask questions later. This is my favorite tip. It can be applied so many different ways. Instance number one: if you’re shooting candid shots at a festival or on the street, it’s much easier to take a photograph f you see one, than to try to stop the person, ask for their photo, and hope that they say yes. It probably won’t happen because that’s weird, but if you had gone ahead and taken the photograph when you saw it, the worst thing that could happen is them ask you why you’re taking photos, which, honestly is a chance to give them a business card. Instance number two: if you’re feeling unsure about what you’re creating, just keep making it. The worst that could happen is you made something that you only kind of like, and the concept of it could be something you build on later. It’s a good lesson to learn over and over again.

Hey, I hope you enjoyed those tips. They’ve really helped me out over the years, so enjoy, and please message me if you have any questions. Thanks!

—Forrest Lane

bed head lonelylonelylonelyeyes + deer

I’m taking a little drive today.

I’m taking a little drive today.

Ginny - Shot by Me

Ginny - Shot by Me

Golden Hour

Golden Hour

(Source: 4estabon, via 4estabon)

Photography Lessons

It’s kind of astounding how words can tie knots in stomachs,

That we, just like film, develop from our negatives.

That we can be happy and not smile

Or sad and not frown.

—Forrest Lane

(Source: 4estabon)

Rain

You may not know this now,

You may never know this again,

But I loved you long ago,

And I could always love you again.

—Forrest Lane